Interaction suppressors


Intragenic interaction suppressors restore the functional association of two residues within a gene product -- either a single polypeptide chain or a single RNA molecule. The mechanism may be due to compensating changes in two residues that fold up to interact in a single-subunit, or compensating changes in two residues that interact in a homodimer.

Intergenic interaction suppressors restore the functional association of two residues in different gene products -- either two different polypeptides, two different nucleic acid molecules, or a polypeptide and a nucleic acid molecule. When the two mutations both affect polypeptide chains, the mechanism is often due to compensating changes in heteromultimeric proteins.

The following cartoons give examples of how interaction suppressors might occur. For some specific examples, see the discussion of intragenic suppressors.


Intragenic interaction suppressors:


Intergenic interaction suppressors:


REFERENCE:

Manson, M. 2000. Allele-specific suppression as a tool to study protein-protein interactions in bacteria. Methods 20: 18-34.


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This page is maintained by Stanley Maloy, please send comments, suggestions, or questions to s-maloy@uiuc.edu
Last modified September 11, 2000