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Application by MWD to Appropriate Water by Permit from the Whitewater River

[The document below does not follow exactly the format of the original, but it does present in full all information in the original. The headings and questions on the application form are give in regular type. Information provided by the applicant is presented in boldface. A few of the more salient numbers and statements have been highlighted in red. Attachments 1 and 5 to the original application are not presented here as such. They contain responses to individual questions on the application form and those responses have simply been inserted at the appropriate locations on the form. Attachments 3 and 6 are maps not yet in form suitable for website presentation and are omitted for the time being. J.S. Dainer, SDSU]


 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA
State Water Resources Control Board
DIVISION OF WATER RIGHTS
901 P Street, Sacramento
PO Box 2000, Sacramento, CA 95812-2000

APPLICATION TO APPROPRIATE WATER BY PERMIT

1. APPLICANT

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California
PO Box 54153, Los Angeles, California 90054-0153
Tel. (213)-217-6000

2. SOURCE

a. The name of the source at the point of diversion is Whitewater River and Ag. drains in the vicinity of the Whitewater River tributary to Salton Sea.

b. In a normal year does the stream dry up at any point downstream from your project? No.

What alternate sources are available to your project should a portion of your requested direct diversion season be excluded because of a dry stream or nonavailability of water?
The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (Metropolitan) has alternative sources available from the Colorado River and the State Water Project. Diversions made pursuant to this application will provide an additional, alternative source of water to Metropolitan.

3. POINTS of DIVERSION and REDIVERSION

a. The point of diversion will be in the county of Riverside County.

b. List all points giving coordinate distances from section corner or other ties as allowed by Board regulations, i.e., California Coordinate System. Points of diversion will be located along the Whitewater River and on irrigation drains in the vicinity of the Whitewater River as described on attachment 3.

c. Does the applicant own the land at the point of diversion? No.

d. If the applicant does not own the land at the point of diversion, state name and address of owner and what steps have been taken to obtain right of access: Applicant will purchase or obtain by eminent domain the necessary right of access.

4. PURPOSE of USE, AMOUNT and SEASON

a. State the purposes for which water is to be appropriated, the quantities of water for search purpose, and the dates between which diversions will be made.

PURPOSE OF USE: Municipal & Industrial, Irrigation/Fish & Wildlife

DIRECT DIVERSION

QUANTITY

RATE: 100 cubic feet per second

AMOUNT: 100,000 acre-feet per year

SEASON OF DIVERSION: January 1 - December 31

STORAGE

AMOUNT: 100,000 acre-feet per annum

COLLECTION SEASON: January 1 - December 31

b. Total combined amount taken by direct dirversions and storage during any one year will be 100,000 acre-feet.

5. JUSTIFICATION OF AMOUNT

a. IRRIGATION: Agricultural water demand in the region is projected based on land-use trends, urbanization, value of crops produced, and expected cost of supplying water. Based on these trends, it is expected that regional agricultural water needs will decrease from 400,000 acre-feet observed in 1990 to about 280,000 acre-feet by 2020, see Attachment 4 (Southern California's Integrated Water Resources Plan).

e. MUNICIPAL: Metropolitan uses an econometric model known as MWD-MAIN to help forecast urban demands at the retail level. This model is based on the national state-of-the-art model IWR-MAIN. For the purpose of demand forecasting, Metropolitan uses projections of long-term demographics from adopted regional growth management plans provided by the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and the San Diego Associations of Governments (SANDAG). Currently Metropolitan is referencing the Growth Management Element of the 1993 Regional Comprehensive Plan (RCP) developed by SCAG (adopted in September 1994) and the Preliminary Series 8 forecasts issued by SANDAG, see Attachment 4 (Southern California's Integrated Water Resources Plan).

POPULATION
MAXIMUM MONTH
ANNUAL USE
5-Year periods until use is completed
Average daily use
(gal per capita)
Rate of diversion (cfs)
Average daily use
(gal.per capita)
Acre-foot
(per capita)
Total
Acre-feet
PERIOD
POP.
present
16,144,000
233
NA
187
.21
3,374,328
2000
16,819,000
235
NA
188
.21
3,538,368
2005
17,944,000
237
NA
190
.21
3,811,769
2010
19,035,000
238
NA
191
.21
4,027,830
2015
20,206,000
240
NA
192
.22
4,294,311
2020
21,491,000
241
NA
193
.22
4,643,014

Month of maximum use during year is: August. 
Month of minimum use during year is: January

h. INDUSTRIAL: The type of industry is ______. Basis for determination for amount of water needed is______.

Commercial and Institutional water demand includes water used by businesses, services, government, and institutions (such as hospitals, schools, and colleges). This sector currently accounts for about 17 percent of the total urban water demand and is expected to increase its share to 18 percent by the year 2010. In 1990, there were an estimated 345,000 commercial establishments in the Metropolitan's service area, employing over 6.17 million people. Historically, each commercial/institutional establishment uses 1,480 gallons per day on average, while each employee consumes 92 gallons per day. Most commercial/institutional water is used indoors (71 percent), followed by outdoor uses (22 percent) and cooling water (7 percent).

Industrial (manufacturing) water use is the other major component of non-residential water use. In 1990, industrial water use accounted for 6 percent of urban water use and is expected to decrease to 5 percent of urban demand by 2010. The increasing effect of conservation measures in the industrial sector and the expected decrease in the region's manufacturing base are two factors that are reducing the future share of industrial water use. Historically, a typical industrial establishment uses 5,600 gallons per day on average, or about 127 gallons per day per employee. Nearly 80 percent of this water is used indoors. Other industrial water is used outdoors (12 percent) and for cooling water (8 percent), see Attachment 4 (Southern California's Integrated Water Resources Plan).

k. FISH AND WILDLIFE PRESERVATION AND/OR ENHANCEMENT: Yes

6. PLACE OF USE

a. Does applicate own the land where the water will be used? No
  Is land in joint ownershiip? No

b. USE IS WITHIN: The Place of Use is described as - Distribution and use within the boundaries of The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, as shown on Attachment 2

 7. DIVERSION WORKS

a. Diversion will be by gravity by means of______
b. Diversion will be by pumping from______.
c. Conduit from diversion point to first lateral or to offstream reservoir______.

[Response to items above:]

The diversion works may include a dam across the Whitewater River within the river reach extending from its mouth at the Salton Sea to a location approximately 3 miles upstream from its mouth. This dam may be constructed of concrete or be a rubber darn type and may include crest gates or other facilities to allow for the control of upstream water surface elevation throughout the range of river flows. Other facilities may also be provided to allow for periodic sluicing of sediments downstream. The diversion facilities may also include a sedimentation basin located on the east side of the Whitewater River within the vicinity of the diversion dam which will be used to collect a portion of the river sediments contained within the diverted flows

Diverted river flows will be conveyed within a canal to a water treatment plant located near the north shore of the Salton Sea. The canal will be designed to intercept and divert irrigation system drains located between the proposed diversion dam on the Whitewater River and the water treatment plant. The canal will also extend eastward from the water treatment plant location to intercept and divert additional irrigation drains located on the east side of the treatment plant. The following irrigation drains will be intercepted, (see attachment 3):

* Buchanan Street Storm Channel
* Buchanan Drain
* Lincoln Street Stormwater Channel
* Johnson Street Drain
* Grant Street Drain
* Grant North Drain
* Hayes Street Drain

* Garfield 0.5 Drain
* Arthur Street Drain
* Garfield Street Drain
* Cleveland Street Drain
* Cleveland Street East Drain
* Cleveland 0.5 Drain
* McKinley Street Drain

Diverted river and irrigation drain flows may be treated using microfiltration and reverse osmosis processes to reduce the concentration of total dissolved solids. A treatment plant in fluent pump forebay will be constructed to allow for the withdrawal of raw water into the water treatment facilities. Treated water will be conveyed from the water treatment plant to the Colorado River Aqueduct at the location just upstream from the Coachella Tunnel (approx. CRA mile 149). The conveyance system will consist of a canal, pipelines, and pumping plants. The preliminary routing of the treated water conveyance system is shown on the Project Map included with this application. The routing of the conveyance system components may be revised should the results of additional project technical and environmental evaluations indicate it is desirable to do so. The major features of the presently planned conveyance system components are indicated in Table 1.

Table 1
Whitewater River Diversion Works
Conveyance System
Conduit
Material
Cross
Sectional
Dimension
Length
(feet)
Total Lift
or Fall
(feet)
Capacity
(cfs)

Canal A

Unlined

Depth: 5 ft
Bot. Width: 10ft
Top Width: 30 ft

35,000
5 Fall
100

Canal B

Concrete Lined

Depth: 9 ft
Bot. Width: 10 ft
Top Width: 37 ft

42,000
5 Fall
600

Pipeline A

Buried Steel

42 inch

18,900
280 Lift
70

Pipeline B

Buried Steel

108 inch

35,700
1,690 Lift
600

Table 1
continued
Pumping Plant
Capacity (cfs)
Horsepower

Plant A
Plant B
Plant C

70
70
70
3,500
9,100
9,100

8. COMPLETION SCHEDULE

a. Year work will start: 2000-2005    b. Year work will be completed: 2010-2015

c. Year water will be used to the full extent intended: It is anticipated that water will be put to full beneficial use as soon as the project is completed.

9. GENERAL

a. Name of the post office most used by those living near the proposed point of diversion is: Coachella, and Mecca.

b. Does any part of the place of use comprise a subdivision on file with the State Department Real Estate? Yes.

If yes, state name of subdivsion: Numerous subdivisions exist within the proposed place of use. See Attachment 2.

Is it planned to individually meter each service connection? Yes.  If yes, when? At time of connection.

c. List the names and addresses of diverters of water from the source of supply downstream from the proposed point of diversion: None.

d. Is the source used for navigation, including use by pleasure boats, for a significant part of each year at the point of diversion, or does the source substantially contribute to a waterway which is used for navigation, including use by pleasure boats? Yes. If yes, explain: Source contributes to the Salton Sea.

10. EXISTING WATER RIGHT

Do you claim an existing right for the use of all or part of the water sought by this application? No.

11. AUTHORIZED AGENT (Optional)

12. SIGNATURE OF APPLICANT

I (we) declare under penalty of perjury that the above is true and correct to the best my (our) knowledge and belief

Dated September 8, 1997 at Los Angeles, California

Signed by: M. Gregory Taylor, General Counsel
        Metropolitan Water District of Southern California

[Filed with the SWRCB on September 9, 1997]        


UNDER GROUND STORAGE SUPPLEMENT

to APPLICATION TO APPROPRIATE WATER BY PERMIT

 

1. State amount of water to be diverted to underground storage from each point of diversion in item 3b of form WR1.

a) MaximumRateofdiversions(1) 100cfs
b) Maximum Annual Amount (1) 100.000 acre-feet

2. Describe any works used to divert to offstream spreading grounds or injection wells not identified in item 7 of form WR1.

Treated flows will be conveyed within a canal or pipeline to existing or additional recharge areas or to injection wells. Other detailed facility discussion has been provided in item 7 form WRl. [See above].

3. Describe spreading grounds and identify its location and number of acres or location of upstream and downstream limits if onstream.

Existing recharge areas would be used, as well as additional recharge or iniection sites that may be identified in the future. The maiority of existing spreading grounds are located offstream and have historically been used to spread imported water for storage. See attachment 6.

4. State depth of groundwater table in spreading grounds or immediate vicinity:

Will be determined during the technical feasibility and environmental documentation phase.

5. Give any historic maximum and or minimum depths to the groundwater table in the area.

Will be determined during the technical feasibility and environmental documentation phase.

6. Describe proposed spreading operation.

Existing recharge areas would be used, as well as additional recharge or iniection sites that may be identified in the future.

7. Describe location, capacity and features of proposed pretreatment facilities and/or injection wells.

Diverted river and irrigation drain flows may be treated using microfiltration and reverse osmosis process to reduce concentrations of total dissolved solids. Iniection wells may be used to place the treated water into storage.

8. Reference any available engineering reports, studies or data on the aquifer involved.

Extensive analysis will be undertaken during the technical feasibility and environmental documentation phase of the program.

9. Describe underground reservoir and attach a map or sketch of its location.

The underground reservoir has been historically used as a conjunctive-use facility operating both the upper and lower Coachella Valley groundwater basins to meet existing and dry year demands. See attachment 6

10. State estimated storage capacity of underground reservoir.

The estimated storage capacity of the underground reservoir will be determine during the technical feasibility and environmental documentation phase of the proposed proiect.

11. Describe existing use of the underground storage reservoir and any proposed change in its use. The underground reservoir presently is used.

The underground reservoir has been historically used as a conjunctive-use facility operating both the upper and lower Coachella Valley groundwater basins to meet existing and dry year demands. The proposed use of the basin will be similar to its historic use. If the proposed use of the underground reservoir is determined to feasible. than it would onlv proceed upon agreement with Coachella Valley Water District.

12. Describe the proposed method and location of measurement of water placed into and withdrawn from underground storage.

Water will measured during the placement into the groundwater reservoir and extraction from the groundwater reservoir. The methodology and facilities used to measure flows will be determine during the technical feasibility and environmental documentation phase.


APPLICATION TO APPROPRIATE WATER BY PERMIT

ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION

(THIS IS NOT A CEQA DOCUMENT)

APPLICATION NO.______

The following information will aid in the environmental review of your application as required by the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). IN ORDER FOR YOUR APPLICATION TO BE ACCEPTED AS COMPLETE, ANSWERS TO THE QUESTIONS LISTED BELOW MUST BE COMPLETED TO THE BEST OF YOUR ABILITY. Failure to answer all questions may result in your application being returned to you, causing delays in processing. If you need more space, attach additional sheets. Additional information may be required from you to amplify further or clarify the information requested in this form.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

1. Provide a description of your project, including but not limited to type of construction activity, structures existing or to be built, area to be graded or excavated and project operation, including how the water will be used

The diversion works may include a dam across the Whitewater River within the river reach extending from its mouth at the Salton Sea to a location approximately 3 miles upstream from its mouth. This dam may be constructed of concrete or be a rubber dam type and may include crest gates or other facilities to allow for the control of upstream water surface elevation throughout the range of river flows. Other facilities may also be provided to allow for periodic sluicing of sediments downstream. The diversion facilities may also include a sedimentation basin located on the east side of the Whitewater River within the vicinity of the diversion dam which will be used to collect a portion of the river sediments contained within the diverted flows. Diverted river flows will be conveyed within a canal to a water treatment plant located near the north shore of the Salton Sea. The canal will be designed to intercept and divert irrigation system drains located between the proposed diversion dam on the Whitewater River and the water treatment plant. The canal will also extend eastward from the water treatment plant location to intercept and divert additional irrigation drains located on the east side of the treatment plant. The following irrigation drains will be intercepted:

* Buchanan Street Storm Channel
* Buchanan Drain
* Lincoln Street Stormwater Channel
* Johnson Street Drain
* Grant Street Drain
* Grant North Drain
* Hayes Street Drain

* Garfield 0.5 Drain
* Arthur Street Drain
* Garfield Street Drain
* Cleveland Street Drain
* Cleveland Street East Drain
* Cleveland 0.5 Drain
* McKinley Street Drain

Diverted river and irrigation drain flows will probably be treated using microfiltration and reverse osmosis processes to reduce the concentration of total dissolved solids. A treatment plant influent pump forebay will be constructed to allow for the withdrawl of raw water into the water treatment facilities. Treated water will be conveyed from the water treatment plant to the Colorado River Aqueduct at the location just upstream from the Coachella Tunnel (approx. CRA mile 149). The conveyance system will consist of a canal, pipelines, and pumping plants. The preliminary routing of the treated water conveyance system is shown on the Project Map included with this application. The routing of the conveyance system components may be revised should the results of additional technical and environmental evaluations indicate it is desirable to do so.

GOVERNMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

Before a final decision can be made on your water rights application, we must consider the information contained in an environmental document prepared in compliance with the requirements of CEQA. If an environmental document has been prepared for your project by another agency, we must consider it. If one has not been prepared, a determination must be made as to who is responsible for the preparation of the environmental document for your project. The following questions are designed to aid us in that detemmination.

2. Contact your county planning or public works department for the following information:

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, acting as lead agency as required under CEQA will consult with all interested parties concerning the proposed program during the preparation of the Environmental Impact Report.

3. Are any additional state or federal permits required for your project?

To construct the proposed project, Metropolitan may be required to obtain permits and/or approvals from other agencies. These agencies may include, but are not limited to, the following:

Federal Agencies

Bureau of Land Management
United Sates Army Corps of Engineers
United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Construction Permits (Special Use)
Section 404 Permits
Section 7 Consultation

State Agencies

California Department of Fish and Game
California Department of Water Resources
Regional Water Quality Control Board

Start Water Resources Control Board

Section 1601 Permits
Dam Safety Perrnits
Certification for Placement of Fill
Water Discharge Permits
Water Rights Permits

Local/Regional Agencies

South Coast Air Management District
Riverside County
Imperial County
Affected Cities and Local Agencies

Stationary Emissions Sources
Grading Permits
Grading Permits
Grading Permits

4. Has any public agency prepared an environmental document for any aspect of your project? Yes

The Southern California Associations of Governments has prepared an Environmental Impact Report concerning potential impacts and future growth.

5. Will your project, during construction or operation, generate waste or wastewaater contining such things as sewage, industrial chemicals, metals, or agricultural chemicals, or cause erosion, turbidity or sedimentation?  Yes If so, explain 

It is anticipated that the proposed project will create some form of waste discharge. This discharge will be identified during the environmental evaluation phase and will be documented and coordinated with the Regional Water Quality Control Board.

6. Have any aarcheological reports been prepared on this project, or will you be preparing an archeological report to satisfy another public agency?

It is possible that the proposed project may have Archeological impacts. Archeological Sites will be identified during the environmental evaluation phase and will be documented and coordinated with the proper agency.

ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING

7. Three sets of color photgraphs required [Not available in this web version of the document.JSD]

8. From the list given below, mark or circle the general plant community types which best describe those which occur within your project area.

9. Provide below an estimate of the type, number, and size (trunk/stem diameter at chest height) of trees and large shrubs that aare planned to be removed or destroyed due to construction and opeeration of your project. Consider all aspects of your project, including diversion structures, water distribution and use facillities, and changes in the places of use due to additional water development.

10. Identify the typical species of fish which occur in the source(s) from which you propose to divert water and discuss whether or not any of these fish species or their habitat has been or would be affected by your project.

11. Identify the typical species of riparian and terrestrial wildlife in the project aarea and discuss whether or not any of these species and/or their habitat has been or would be affected by your project through construction of waater diversion and distributiion works and changes in the places of water use.

[Response to items 7-11 above:]

It is possible that the proposed project may have impacts to various plant communities, and fish and wildlife. The existing environmental setting and potential impacts will be identified during the environmental evaluation phase. This information will be documented and coordinated with the proper agency.

12. Does your proposed project involve any construction or grading-related activity which has significantly altered or would significantly alter the bed or bank of any stream or lake?

The proposed project will involve the placement of fill within the Whitewater River and grading of the proposed conveyance corridors and treatment side. The potential impacts associated with said activities will be identified during the environmental evaluation phase. This information will be documented and coordinated with the proper agency.


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