CBEACH

PROJECT STARRT: CDC SUPPLEMENT

RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY ANALYSES OF AIDS-RELATED SOCIAL SKILLS IN ANGLO AND LATINO YOUTH

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Behavioral Ecological Model

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The proposed study will explore the validity of, and the theoretical relationships among social skills and other dependent variables often employed in AIDS prevention studies (e.g., condom use). This proposal will employ data from a completed NIH-funded clinical trial testing social skills training procedures in Latino and Anglo adolescents (N=307). Self-report datta concerning AIDS-related risk behaviors and their theoretical determinants will be linked with objective videotape data of AIDS-related social skills. The proposed project will explore a number of questions concerning the social, predictive, and construct validity of our objective role-play measure of social skills, as well as the overall Behavioral Ecological Model employed as a foundation for this study. Four specific analyses will be conducted using correlational and regression procedures: 1) a predictive validity analysis of social skills acquisition for decreasing sexual risk practices associated with HIV transmission; 2) a construct validity analysis of social skills using hypothesized convergent, divergent, and discriminant associations; 3) a social validity analysis of the change (pre/post) in assertiveness on the Condom Negotiation skill from our videotaped role-play measure; and 4) a predictive validity analysis of the Behavioral Ecological model, including measures of social skills for HIV-related risk practices (e.g., condom use). The social validity component will be completed by obtaining ratings of skill acquisition from three groups of judges: professionals (n=10), parents (n=10), and peers (n=10). These groups will provide ratings indicating the degree to which the absolute level of, and change in, target skills are effective for AIDS prevention. These analyses will inform development of valid measures, refinement of theory, and control of AIDS in Latino and Anglo youth.

Principal Investigator: Mel Hovell, PhD, MPH

Project Coordinators: n/a

Funded 1996-1997

Source: Centers for Disease Control

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