CBEACH

PROJECT SIROCCO

ETS REDUCTION IN HIGH RISK PRETEENS: A CONTROLLED TRIAL

Home

Mission

Research

Resources

Who We Are

Library

Opportunities

Directions to C-BEACH

Links

Awards

Behavioral Ecological Model

Students/Advisees

Parent counseling reduced children's secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in our previous studies. This study will determine if interventions directed to preteens alone can reduce SHS exposure. Our original pilot study showed that counseling reduced preteens' SHS exposure. New analyses showed that counseling reduced exposure to preteens in our NIH asthma study. A third pilot showed that counseling plus feedback and incentives reduced preteens SHS exposure. This trial will determine the effects of counseling + feedback + incentives on SHS exposure and susceptibility to smoking among high-risk preteens. 250 youth 8-12 years olds, including African-American, Latino, Anglo, and other racial/ethnic groups, will be recruited. Preteens must be nonsmokers who are exposed to SHS in their home. Youth will be recruited sequentially and assigned to usual education or counseling, cotinine feedback and contingent incentives. Outcome measures will be obtained prior to intervention, and at 4, 8, and 12 months. Urine samples will be analyzed for cotinine using highly sensitive (detection limit .05 ng/ml) and reliable procedures as employed by CDC (ID-LC/MS/MS). The same measures will be used for cotinine feedback. Repeated measures analyses of differential exposure to SHS will be employed. Mixed effect regression (REML) and GEE models will be used for outcome analyses. Exploratory analyses will address questions about the environmental and social determinants of tobacco use and SHS exposure based on our Behavioral Ecological Model. We also will explore the feasibility of conducting a phenotype interview of tobacco addiction, and we will collect personnel and other cost data from which later cost/utility analyses can be computed. With increased fidelity, additional recruitment sources, and our past successful SHS studies, we are confident that this trial will be completed successfully and contribute to SHS exposure reduction and possibly smoking prevention in high-risk youth.

Principal Investigator: Mel Hovell, PhD, MPH

Project Coordinators:Jennifer Jones, MPH and Dennis Wahlgren, MA

Funded 2003-2007

Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Notepad

Back to Research