TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR BROWSING THE SURVEY

Survey Question

Content

Question Description

Intro page

 

General demographic information

2.1

Missing-addend problem regarding Pokemon cards

Do you think that a first grader could solve this?

2.2

 

Support your position on the Pokemon question.

2.3

Multiplication problem regarding number of sticks of gum

Do you think that a first grader could solve this?

2.4

 

Support your position on the gum question.

3.1

Six children's strategies for solving the problem 149 + 286

View all 5 strategies; indicate whether they make sense.

3.2–3.5

 

Which would you like to see shared?

In what order would you share them?

Comment on how the traditional strategy compares to others.

4.1–4.5

Two children's written work for solving
635 – 482

Comparing traditional and nontraditional approaches

4.6–4.10

 

Further probing to compare the two approaches for subtraction

5.0

 

What were your reactions when a teacher asked you to solve a new type of problem?

5.1 Question

 

When you are a teacher, will you ask your students to solve novel problems?

5.1 Explanation–5.2

 

Please elaborate your answer. How often would you have students solve novel problems?

6

 

How sure are you that you want to become a teacher?

7.1

Video I

Did anything in the video clip stand out for you?

7.2–7.3

 

Comment on strengths and weaknesses of the teaching.

7.4–7.5

 

Do you think that the child could have solved the problem with less help?

8.1

Fraction operations vs. word problems

Rank the difficulty of four fraction problems, presented in terms of mathematical symbols and also in contexts of story problems.

8.2

 

Explain your ranking.

8.3

 

How are you thinking about understanding?

8.4

 

Explain further what you mean by understand.

9.1–9.3

View video II

Write your reactions. Would you expect this student to be able to solve another similar problem?

9.4–9.6

View video III

What happened? 

10–16

 

Questions regarding views and opinions on background in and the nature of mathematics